Caring for Kids with HIV and TB

Sani sits in the doorway of her one-room house with her baby girl Mel in her arms. A pink sunset illuminates the Durban township of KwaMashu that unfolds below her clifftop house. She looks lovingly at Mel, then takes out a syringe and struggles to give the two-year-old,a medicine that is over 40% alcohol.

Renewed commitment of the German Government to neglected diseases

KfW, on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), grants EUR 10 Million to DNDi

DNDi has been awarded EUR 10 million towards the development of treatments against sleeping sickness, visceral leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and filarial diseases. The grant will be starting this year and be disbursed over five years.

“Towards Ending the Neglect?” DNDi releases update on its Paediatric HIV Programme

[July 2016]

As the International AIDS Conference kicks off in Durban, the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has released an update on its efforts to develop optimal child-adapted antiretroviral formulations. This document details some recent progress towards its final goal of developing “4-in-1” fixed-dose combinations using the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended treat­ment regimen for infants and young chil­dren. DNDi’s update also discusses some promising developments for treatment for children living with both HIV and tuberculosis (TB).

The global response to AMR must not fail to address the needs of neglected patients

Manica BalasegaramManica Balasegaram, Director, Global Antiobiotic Research and Development Partnership
[June 2016]

Far from being an apocalyptic fantasy, a post-antibiotic era in which common infections and minor injuries can kill has become a very real possibility. Of late, media headlines about ‘the end of the road’ for antibiotics have been plentiful. The latest case in May this year to receive a good deal of attention was of a patient in the US found to be carrying bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort.

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AusTrade supports Epichem leishmaniasis research programme

DNDi and its partner Epichem are pleased to announce that the Australian Tropical Medicine Commercialisation Grants Programme (ATMCG), with the support of Australia’s Trade and Investment Ministry (AusTrade), are providing $250,000 for a project which is focused on developing new treatments for leishmaniasis. The name of the project is: “Novel compounds for the treatment of Leishmaniasis in humans and animals,” which will be led by PharmAust Limited’s (ASX:PAA) subsidiary Epichem in partnership with DNDi.

Mycetoma: A Simple Thorn Prick

Every Monday morning at a clinic on the dusty outskirts of the Sudanese capital Khartoum, sufferers of one of the world’s most neglected disease flock to the only place in the world that can offer them specialized care and treatment. Patients stream through the gates limping, on crutches, pushed by worried relatives on rusty wheelchairs or carried. Most have bandaged legs, many are amputees.

Malaria: New research promises to ease access to ASAQ and ASMQ treatment

Access to effective treatment is central in the fight against malaria. The recently published PREGACT study has shown that artemisinin-based combination therapies are effective in pregnant women with malaria in Africa, without the safety concerns of other treatment types. Another success for malaria treatment comes with the World Health Organization’s announcement that the fixed-dose combination of artesunate+mefloquine (ASMQ) shelf-life has been extended from two to three years, which will greatly help with storage and distribution.

What role for DNDi in hepatitis C?

Bernard Pécoul, Executive Director, DNDi
[April 2016]

The barriers to accessing new hepatitis C treatments are a clear illustration of how today’s system of medical innovation is failing to deliver affordable treatments for people in need. So what should the public health community do to address this complete disconnect between highly successful innovation on the one hand, and unacceptably limited access on the other?