Patients treated for visceral leishmaniasis can still transmit the disease even after completing treatment, study shows

Geneva/New Delhi – 22 July 2019
Results show that a skin condition known as post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) could be a threat to elimination of leishmaniasis in South Asia
The results of an innovative “infectivity” study conducted by DNDi and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh confirm that people successfully treated for visceral leishmaniasis in South Asia can still infect others if they develop a skin condition known as PKDL.

ECTMIH 2019

16-20 September 2019
Liverpool, UK

  • DND– one symposium on cutaneous leishmaniasis and one on mycetoma
  • Nathalie Strub-Wourgaft, NTD Director – panel discussion on the future of research and development, satellite symposium on sleeping sickness

Free public event on the sidelines of ECTMIH 2019

Better than boiling oil or amputation? Stories behind the treatment needs of two of the world’s most neglected tropical diseases, cutaneous leishmaniasis and mycetoma

16 September 2019
Liverpool, UK

  • Join us on the sidelines of the 2019 European Congress for Tropical Medicine and International Health for the engaging stories of Pip Stewart, a British adventurer who contracted CL on a record-breaking paddling trip in the Amazon, and two researchers working on the first-ever clinical trial for a fungal mycetoma treatment, Dr Borna Nyaoke, a physician and clinical researcher from DNDi based in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dr Sahar Bakhiet, a microbiologist at the Mycetoma Research Centre in Khartoum, Sudan who works with communities affected by mycetoma.

MedTrop 2019

Congress of the Brazilian Society of Tropical Medicine

28-31 July 2019
Belo Horizonte, Brazil

  • DNDi participating in several round tables and doing presentations on Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, and hepatitis C