DNDi and Cipla to Develop 4-in-1 Paediatric Antiretroviral Drug Combination – New formulation to fill the deadly gap in appropriate HIV medicines

[Washington, DC; Geneva; Mumbai – 20 July 2012]
On the eve of the XIX International AIDS Conference in Washington, DC, the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), a not-for-profit research and development (R&D) organization, announced a new collaboration with Indian drug manufacturer Cipla to develop and produce an improved first-line antiretroviral (ARV) combination therapy specifically adapted to meet the treatment needs of infants and toddlers living with HIV/AIDS. Once delivered, this new paediatric ARV combination could help to accelerate the provision of care to the world’s youngest children living with HIV/AIDS, who are at very high risk of dying without treatment. An estimated 3.4 million children have HIV/AIDS, but less than a quarter currently have access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), compared with 54% for adults. Without treatment, more than half of children with HIV/AIDS will die before their second birthday, and 80% will die before they turn five.

Children with HIV/AIDS Falling Through the Cracks of Treatment Scale-Up Efforts

[Geneva, Switzerland/New York, USA – 1 December 2011]
Less than one-quarter (23%) of children with HIV/AIDS who need treatment are getting it, according to a report released by the World Health Organization (WHO) on the occasion of World AIDS Day (1 December 2011). Although treatment coverage for adults has been steadily climbing and has now reached approximately half of those in need, coverage for children is lagging far behind, highlighted the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), a non-profit research and development organization that has recently launched a new paediatric HIV drug development programme.

Elisabeth Glaser Paediatric AIDS Foundation’s Blog [August 19, 2011]
“What we are reading: Peadiatric AIDS as a Neglected Disease”

DNDi Launches New Drug Development Programme to Address Treatment Needs of Children with HIV/AIDS

[Geneva, Switzerland and Rome, Italy – July 18, 2011]
Today at the 6th International AIDS Society (IAS) Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) announced the launch of a new drug development programme to address critical unmet treatment needs of children with HIV/AIDS.
Listen to the podcasts of Bernard Pécoul and Marc Lallemant on DNDi‘s portfolio expansion to paediatric HIV
[Español] [Portuguese]

 

IAS 2011

[July 17-20, 2011]
Rome, Italy
With the expansion of its portfolio to paediatric HIV, DNDi attended the IAS conference to advocate on R&D needs for better adapted drugs for infants

DNDi lanza programa de desarrollo de nuevos medicamentos para satisfacer las necesidades de tratamiento de niños con VIH / SIDA

[Ginebra / Roma – 18 de julio de 2011]
Hoy, en la 6 ª Conferencia de la AIDS Society International (IAS) sobre la patogénesis, tratamiento y prevención del VIH, la iniciativa Medicamentos para Enfermedades Olvidadas (DNDi) ha anunciado el lanzamiento de un programa de desarrollo de nuevos medicamentos para satisfacer la necesidad urgente de tratamiento en niños con VIH / SIDA.
[English] [Portuguese]

DNDi lança Programa de Desenvolvimento de Novos Medicamentos para Atender às necessidades de Tratamento de Crianças com HIV/Aids

[Genebra / Roma – 18 julho 2011]
Hoje, no 6ª Conferência da Sociedade International de Aids (IAS) sobre patogênese, tratamento e prevenção do HIV, a iniciativa Medicamentos para Doenças Negligenciadas (DNDi) anunciou o lançamento de um programa de desenvolvimento de medicamentos novos para atender à urgente necessidade de tratamento em crianças com HIV/Aids.
[English] [Spañol]

More Sustainable Resources Needed

[February 2010]
Despite the establishment of Product Development Partnerships like DNDi and new commitments from public and private donors, funding for scientific and medical innovation for diseases that disproportionately affect the developing world remains inadequate. DNDi and the George Institute launched in February 2010 a new report on the challenges of registering new drugs for neglected diseases in the African context.